Finally Built the Keggerator

This has been a long time coming. Finally I have draft beer in my condo. This build has been planned for about 3 or 4 months now. The goal was simple, 1 mini fridge, 3 taps. So maybe not as simple as I made is sounds. After a month of snooping online and carefully measuring everything a friend said “Why not do a build similar to this?”. So I ditched all my other ideas and used that post as a guide.

First was finding that mini fridge. A Danby 4.4 cubic foot mini fridge. This one to be a little more specific. There are a few different colour schemes so pick whatever you like. For me black is sexy so I went with that.

Next you obviously need kegs and all the other bits and pieces. You will need ball lock kegs to make this fit. Two 5 gal kegs and 1 that is 3 gal or less. For me 3 gal and 2.5 gal were the same price so 3 gal it is! Make sure to do a good PBW soak and such even if the kegs are new. Star san them and then purge out and leave ready for closed transfers.

So you have all your parts. Now it is time to get it all together so that you never leave home again because you beer on tap. You’re going to need some tools and a bit of know how. You will need:

  • Drill
  • Drill bits (most important is the step bit)
  • Utility knife (FRESH BLADE)
  • Silicone
  • Silicone gun
  • Rivets
  • Rivet gun
  • Nylon clamps appropriate to tubing O.D.
  • Zipties
  • Round/flat file
  • Large Adjustable Wrench
  • 2 appropriately sized electrical grommets
  • Spray foam

18009607_10155017881565336_248241449_n-e1492457177918.jpgWhen you take the fridge out of the box there should be some grey plastic protecting the medal door Keep it for later. Start out by removing all the shelves and other loose things on the door and inside the main body. Then remove the 3 screws on the back for the top and then the 3 screws holding the door hinge. Keep those in a pint glass somewhere safe. Remove the door. Now see all that annoying stuff jutting out of the door? We need to get rid of that to make room for kegs. Remove the door seal. Get your utility knife and fresh blade out and start to carve along all the 90 degree areas. Once through get your blade as close to parallel with the door and start to shave those pesky bits off. Eventually it’ll just fall right off and look something like this.

Now at this point all the kegs can fit in there but we will need our gas lines in and out taps. Next step is going to be the most tricky one so go slow. We need to add our 3 taps in. For drilling into the face of the door I used a stepped drill bit that went all the way up to 7/8″. Just large enough for the tap tail pieces. So I carefully measured my centers of where I wanted them (high up on the door) and drilled a 1/8″ pilot hole. After that I got out the step bit and in about 1 min I had all 3 holes drilled out. This is what a step bit looks like.17965707_10155017881750336_582663923_nAnd here is what the door looks like.

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Now the back looks pretty ugly so my OCD said I should clean it up a bit. Remember that grey plastic from earlier? Well it fits almost perfectly on one dimension and when you trim off the excess it fits perfectly. Get out some silicone (outdoor silicone is best) and lather that thing up. Now you have a less ugly inside. Once the silicone has set drill out the back piece with a 7/8″ bit and carefully file the metal to remove any spurs.

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While the silicone is setting it’s time to work on the other part of the fridge. This build doesn’t allow for the CO2 tank to be in the fridge so you’ll want some holes in there. Because of my short line length I couldn’t make them go through the easy place in the bottom. So I had to go through the side. With your knife carefully carve off a credit card sized piece of the inside plastic. Then with a spoon or something dull scoop out the plastic to expose the outside metal. If you are like me you will have found some wire/tube covered in aluminium tape. I have no idea what this is but it is probably best not to damage it.

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I put mine in right above the step in the back. Now its time to drill and make sure you miss that tube/wire. Depending on the grommet size you will have to drill an appropriately sized hole. I used 3/4″ grommets and they were a touch small and needed to be filed down in the bottom to accommodate the crimp clamp on my gas lines.

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Once this is done stick something in there and fill the rest with spray foam. Let set. While that is setting rivet in the manifold/tubing and also add a 90° street elbow to the manifold. If you’re using aluminium rivets and a cheap rivet gun you may need pliers to snip off the bits that the gun leaves behind. Remember the file these down. As well If you have a manifold like me you may need to “modify” your rivet gun by filing it down to make it smaller. Before riveting add some silicone to really keep it in place. Once this is done go have a beer and come back to finish the job the next day. 18009750_10155017882270336_1977035638_n
Once everything has set it’s time to do the final steps. Run the lines where you want them and rivet them in with nylon clamps. Put the taps in and zip tie/rivet the tubes into place and re assemble everything/tighten all the fittings. Now all you need to do is put beer in there to chill and carbonate. Some ball lock kegs have a lip around the bottom that juts out a 1/4″. I found this made things a bit too tight to fit so I took a hot knife and cut it down. The small keg in the back is prone to tip forward so I put in a chunk of wood to hold it up. Solid American white oak because no other wood will do.
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And the big reveal!
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3 thoughts on “Finally Built the Keggerator

  1. Pingback: Coconut Kveik Porter and the Intertap Stout Spout | Brewing Forward

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