All Brett Everything: Porter

Apologies first and foremost for the lack of content I have been putting out recently. Getting a brewery off the ground apparently is time consuming. who would have guessed? Anyways I figured that it has been way too long since my last recipe post. It’s been especially long since my last post that uses ingredients that are very easy to find. So with the idea of beers appropriate for Reverence Barrel Works and winter weather beer I bring you the first iteration of my 100% brett fermented porter.

Conception: I wanted a quick turn around brett beer that was approachable for those who are use to only clean styles yet interesting enough to get wild beer fans geeking out a bit. Dark beers with Wyeast Brett Lambicus (5526) have always been a personal favourite of mine due to the fairly intense cherry flavour and aroma. Nothing like black forest cake in liquid form!

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100% Brett Porter V0.0

Water:

  • Calcium: 100 ppm
  • Magnesium: 5 ppm
  • Sodium: 35 ppm
  • Chloride: 60 ppm
  • Sulfate: 50 ppm

Mash pH: 5.3

Mash:

  • Mash in at 153F and hold for 60 min (1.5 qt/lbs)
  • Raise via induction to 168F and hold for 10 min
  • Fly Sparge at 168F

Grist:

  • 76.8% Thomas Fawcett Maris Otter
  • 10.3% Thomas Fawcett Pale Chocolate
  • 5.2% Thomas Fawcett Crystal 45
  • 5.2% Thomas Fawcett Crystal 120
  • 2.5% Weyermann dehusked carafa III

Hot side:

  • 60 min boil
  • FWH EKG for 20 IBU
  • 15 min add whirlfloc and Nutrient
  • 10 min EGK for 4 IBU
  • 5 min add 1 lbs of lactose sugar
  • Chill below 82F

Cold side:

  • Pitch Wyeast 5526 starter (1L starter/5 gal wort) 6 days on stir plate.
  • Let ferment ambient (68F) for 6 weeks
  • Keg and force carbonate

Stats:

  • OG: 1.063
  • FG: 1.011
  • ABV: 6.8
  • IBU: 24
  • BU/GU: 0.37
  • BHE: 82%
  • Fermentor Volume: 4.5 gal
  • Packaged Volume: 4 gal
  • Carbonation: Kegged and force carbed to 2.1 Vols

Review:

Appearance:

Black. Pours a tan 1 finger thick head that sticks around. Head has some very large bubbles and some very tiny ones. After about 5 min it’s still an 1/8” thick. Laces the glass more than most beers. When held up to the lights it’s a very dark brown with a copper hue. Moderately clear as well. Head eventually fades to a halo and a few large patches.

Aroma:

Chocolate cake batter with extra chocolate chips. A generic dark fruit character with a black cherry accent. Hints of leather. For the most part it’s hard to tell this is brett fermented. Rather clean smelling.

Mouthfeel:

Low carbonation that just barely tickles the tongue. Medium creamy body. Coats the 27294905_10155855640000336_1189639510_ntongue. Slightly warming alcohol note.

Flavour:

Rich chocolate cake. Not the kind you get at a kids bday but a decadent cake that I probably couldn’t afford regularly. Similar to the aroma that there is a generic dark fruit flavour with a black cherry accent. The cherry become much more prominent as it warms. Very light floral alcohol. Leather is somewhat there but very mild. Light toffee/caramel on the back end.

Overall Impression:

For around 1 of a 100% brett Porter I am quite pleased. No huge complaints however, I think I would prefer this at a more sessionable ABV. Pretty surprised for how clean this is for a Brett beer and the head retention/lacing. This is a first for me. If I was not told there was brett in here I may not have been able to pick it up.

Next Time:

I plan to knock down the OG to target an ABV of 5.2-5.2. Increase the BU/GU by about 20% to give a little more character. Increase Chloride content to enhance the mouthfeel. Some red wine soaked oak and letting it age an additional 2 weeks to simulate a barrel. Also a bit of O2 in during the fermentation to encourage a slight amount of acetic acid to also make it taste more true to a barrel aged beer.

Cheers,
MD

Switching Careers: Building a Brewery

Well well well. A homebrewer who has a dream of opening their own brewery. What an original idea right? Lets face it if you are a homebrewer the idea has crossed your mind. “I make good beer that people seem to like. I am going to make it professionally and sell it!”. Then they tend to look into what actually goes on at a brewery and they learn that their dream of brewing beer as a career is actually 90% cleaning, 9% legal paperwork and 1% making beer. Not to mention running a business is completely different than a hobby. Also worth mentioning is the ever growing saturation of the market. By the time a new brewery opens they have to fight to get a line at a bar. They have to struggle to sell their IPA on a shelf with over 100 IPAs already.

So why am I going into it and what is “it” exactly? “It” is Reverence Barrel Works. If the name doesn’t already give it away Reverence Barrel Works will have barrels. Lots of them. If you have run into me in online communities or in person you know what my favourite beers are the funky and/or sours. Reverence Barrel Works is going to essentially be a mixed fermentation warehouse. Not a single beer will be made without Brett. Reverence Barrel Works will be in house sales with next to no distribution. So that is the “what” now here is the “why”. My day job is OK but I can’t see myself being here until I retire. My dads family is nearly entirely entrepreneurs. Great grandfather? Moved to Canada during WWII to start his own business and succeed. Grandmothers brother? Started his own business and retired a happy man. My father and his brother? Both run a business. My Mother? You guessed it business owner after retiring from a 30 year nursing career. Relatives still over in the Netherlands also for the most part were business owners prior to retiring. Way back in the 1500s an about 15 x Great grandfather owned and operated a small brewery in the Netherlands. Maybe it’s in my blood. Maybe it’s cause the Dutch are stubborn as mules and hate to work for other people. All I know is it has been a dream to be a business owner since I was very very young.

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How and why in the saturated beer industry? Small, in house and niche. I’ll be starting out by contracting a single brew as the brick and motor location is established and built. once the location is up and running it will be a ~3 bbl system with barrels upon barrels of funky and/or sour beer. The “big guys” (craft breweries in stores and in every bar around the area) can fight among themselves with distribution and all that stuff. With tapline “bribes”, hop contracts and the loathed LCBO I struggle to see how and why I would want to go big. Smaller means less employees and I can focus on small sales of higher end products than bulk sales of standard pale ales. Sure there will be a few specialty bars that focus on my kind of beer that I will try to be in, but for the most part this will be a brewery to customer transaction. With the availability of online sales with direct to doorstep shipping in my area I can supply sour and funky beer lovers with the beverages they love in the comfort of their own home.

There are a lot of people I want to thank for getting to this point. The fine folks on the homebrewing subreddit, the old homebrew ledgends like John Palmer for teaching me in the beginning, my local homebrew club GTA brews, Escarpment Labs, Blogs like Brulosophy, The Mad Fermentationist and The Sour beer Blog, everyone who has contributed to Milk the Funk, the IRC crew, my family/friends and last but not least my extremely supportive and loving SO. She tolerates quite a bit of my BS and understands what being a small business owner will do to our relationship.

I plan to still be actively involved in the homebrewing culture and to hopefully work with educational folks like Escarpment Labs to bring more knowledge to the beer industry and hobby. I also plan to continue sharing recipes and techniques. I wouldn’t be where I am without other sharing so I will pay it forward. Thanks to everyone for the support! It’s a slow and legal path to opening a brewery but I look forward to following in my family steps of becoming a small business owner.

If you want to follow along and watch the building of my brewery check out and follow Reverence Barrel Works on Facebook and Instagram.

Cheers,
MD

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Wild Yeast Isolated

This past summer I collected some berries and plopped them into a small sample of wort. One sample was filled with wild raspberries and the other had black berries. After a few days the samples began to ferment. I took these samples to a local yeast lab (Escarpment Labs) and had them isolated. In all two strains of Saccharomyces as well as what is thought to be Hanseniaspora uvarum were discovered. One of the Saccharomyces was able to ferment a wort of 1.052 down to 1.000 in just 7 days! I will soon be picking up some test samples and fermenting with them. I plan to brew an “All Ontario” Saison with the powerhouse Saccharomyces. Yeast had an apparent attention of Over 95%! The yeast has been unofficially named Gildemeester ale yeast.

All Ontario Farm Ale

Grist:

  • 8 Lbs. Barn Owl Lager Malt
  • 2 Lbs. Barn Owl Munich Malt
  • Mash in with a thickness of 1.6
  • pH of 5.35
  • SO42-/Cl of 2.0

Starting mash temp 113 and ramp up to 148 over 45 min.
Rest for additional 40 min before raising temp to 168 for 10 min
Fly sparge at 168 with 4.5 gal of distilled water.

Boil:

  • 60 min add 2 oz Ontario Crystal 3.21% AA
  • 15 min 1 whirlfloc tablet
  • 15 min add add 1 oz Ontario Crystal 3.21% AA

Chill to 68 and collect 6 gal of wort.
Pitch MWY001 (Blackberry Saccharomyces) at a rate of 750000 cells/ml/P.
Leave in primary for 21 days.
7 days before packaging dry hop with 1 oz Ontario Crystal 3.21% AA
Package and carbonate with 3 vols.

Targets:

  • OG 1.048
  • FG 1.001
  • ABV 6.2
  • SRM 5.75
  • IBU 28

Brewing of this ale will happen mid-late December and, will be enjoyed in the new years.

After this Saturday I will have finished brewing the first version of my house stout, IPA and Belgian golden ale. The BSDA on Brett is slowly fermenting away. RIS is coming out of the barrel, lambic is going in this Saturday. I plan to brew 3 batches next month instead of the standard 4-5.

Cheers,
MD

Over 200 lbs of Grain

Just did a massive bulk order of grains to save a couple bucks down the road. 1 sack Chateau Pilsen malt, 1 sack Thomas Fawcett Pearl, 2 sacks Thomas Fawcett Maris Otter and a 1/4 sack of OiO toasted oat flakes. These sacks should help me really narrow down my core 3 beers I want to have at the brew pub. An Oatmeal stout, a Belgian golden ale and a NE IPA.

The next brews I have planned are as follows: This weekend NE IPA V2.0, Oatmeal stout V1,  barley/wheat/rye wine (cannot decide what grain to use yet), A kellerbier (my first lager) and lastly Belgian golden ale V1.1. In that time I will have bottled my barrel aged RIS, filled the barrel with the lambic I just brewed this past weekend, bottled and served the beer for Pencil Kit Productions and, bottled the Irish red I made with my cousin for his school project

So 2 weekends ago after I got back from Royal City I met up with my cousin and brewed up an Irish red ale for a school project he is doing. They have to do research on Ireland for architecture. Somehow he got the go ahead to make Irish style beer for his university class. This past weekend I brewed up a lambic beer doing a traditional turbid mash and long boil. took me 9 hours to get it into the conical for fermentation.

Cider fermentation is coming along well. Already have some good flavours developing after just a few weeks. Barrel aged beers are coming along nicely. Again a busy month but I’m starting to get more and more into the grove of it.

Cheers,
MD

Brew day at Royal City Brewing Co.

This past Saturday I have the honor of being a guest brewer at Royal City Brewing Co. in Guelph. What? How? Why? Let’s back up a bit.

A few weeks ago my friend Claren contacted me about brewing beer as a fundraiser at an event. The event is produced by Pencil Kit Productions run by Claren and others. The event will be what I can only call an art installation. There will be art in a variety of mediums such as performance, visual and projector. I am very excited to be a part of this and to be able to serve my “art”. When I was asked if I wanted to help out I said “Hell yeah!” without hesitation.

Here is where things got interesting. In order to legal serve home brew for sale the beer must be made under licence at a brewery so that all taxes and such are paid into the greedy pockets of the government. I took to GTAbrews group to figure out how to do this. Long story short Doug -whom I had never met before- seemed like he made a personal mission to help me. Within a few days he had set me up with Royal City Brewing Co. If you have not had their beer go to the brewery! Some very creative and taste stuff. If you cannot make it to the brewery try the Hibiscus Saison or Smoked Honey from the LCBO. They are to die for.

We worked out the details over email and a brief phone conversation and we were ready to rock and roll. Saturday I showed up and was told I would be brewing with the owner and brew master himself! Cam was one of the coolest guys I have ever met. We brewed 11 Gallons of a Belgian pale ale with all American hops. Half will receive dry hop additions and the other half will be aged on spent wine chips and receive dry hop additions. As well Cam had me help move 35 hl of beer into a bright tank. I had an absolute blast hanging out with Cam for the day.

Here is a bit of information about the event (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)event

A huge thank you to the Royal City crew for accommodating me for the day. An even bigger thank you to Cam for sharing so much information and, being excited about what a home brewer is doing.

Hope to see a bunch of people December 9th and 10th!

Cheers,
MD

Cider and Late October Updates

Great Month of brewing and It is not done yet! Cask days was awesome lots of great beers but the best was the cider. Activated charcoal!? Hell yes. Brew slam beer did OK, nothing special but, hey it’s my first comp. The IPA took a bit of yeast on and was not fresh due to the long fermentation. Lavender beer is still mellowing but is great so far! The fractal beer is just WOW. About 40 ABV and dangerously smooth. The pale kellerbier has been pushed back to a date that is TBD still.

The saison I brewed with my cousins is done but, a bit sulfuric. A 1-2 Week period of lagering should clean that up though. The roggenbier is done and that too will be lagered. The FXS has had peanut butter added and will be bottled very soon as well. Belgian Strong dark ale has stalled at 1.045 so, once out of the barrel next weekend the plan is to dry it out a bit with some Brett. B. Then the RIS 1.120 will be moved into the barrel. The BSDA in the barrel is tasting fantastic. Oak and spirit were coming through just after 2 weeks.

Unfortunately I will not be getting 60L of cider this month. However, I am expecting about 20-40L this coming Sunday. Should be fun to experiment with cider and see what I can do. I have over 200 lbs. of grain ordered to arrive mid November. I will be regularly making an IPA, session stout and Belgian golden ale. That will only leave me with 1 week a month for experimentation. Hopefully I can perfect these beers over the next few months.

Next month I will be brewing my Belgian pale ale with American IPA Hops at Royal City Brewing Co. for a fundraiser in December. More details to come on that in a later post. After that my House IPA, House Belgian golden ale, House session stout and turbid mash for a sour. Thinking of doing a Flanders red. Possibly more cider if it comes in. Again another busy month but, what else is new?

I am hoping to write more frequently next month.

Cheers,
MD

 

October plans

Busy Busy Busy. Just finished moving and settling into my new condo. THANK GOODNESS. This is a lot of stress off my chest. Now to focus my time and energy into brewing.

THANKSGIVING will be a busy day. Getting up at 7 to go get ready to brew. I will be teaching my two cousins how to brew all grain! They want to brew a saison which will be a first for me. We will be doing a clean saison with German malts should end up being ~4.8 ABV. Have yet to finalize the grain bill. That brew day will be a busy one!

The NEIPA that My Girlfriend and I brewed in mid September FINALLY finished fermenting. Burton ale yeast is slow apparently. So that IPA will be bottled. Also being bottled will be the oak aged lavender Vermont blonde ale (which may have some wild funk in it). As well as The fractal beer. It should be around 35 ABV by now. The Belgian strong dark ale will be going into a 10 L barrel that previously held rye and apple jack. Some of the quad will also be going into a 1.4 gal fermentation tank with some toasted/charred cherry wood.

Later this month I am expecting about 60 L or more of fresh Ontario pressed apple cider. Very excited to try and play with a cider for my first time. Other brew plans are to do a roggenbier with 60-65% rye malt. A pale kellerbier is also in the work for later this month. At some point my peanut butter stout will need to be bottled as well for the advent calendar brew exchange.

Next weekend I will see how my first ever beer competition went. I had no planning so I am not expecting to win anything. However, that would be a nice surprise. Cask days is coming up later this month as well. I am extremely excited to find some fresh new brewing inspiration. I am thinking of getting a home cask set up at home with a CO2 regulator so that the ale does not spoil for weeks.

October is looking like it will be a great month so there should be lots of updates to come.

Cheers,
MD